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BHS Library


Welcome! There is a wide variety of resources here to help you find information and great books to read, for school or for fun!

 

  • Check out the BHS library catalog for information on print and digital books!
  • Scroll down to the Reference Desk and submit a query to Ms. Rathgeb!
 

School Library Catalog

 

 

Print books, ebooks and audiobooks

Sora

Destiny

eBooks and audiobooks from the 

Citywide Digital Library

 

BHS Print Book catalog

Reference Desk

Print and Digital Books

Print & Digital Books

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Print & Digital Books


Paper books, eBooks and audiobooks are available in three different places through the BHS library. Check out Sora, Comics Plus - Library Pass, and Destiny. And don't forget Brooklyn Public Library as well!

Destiny

Destiny

Destiny is where you can find all of our print books, and it is also has an older collection of digital content from before 2021. You can still access a wide variety of eBooks and audiobooks on this platform, even though we now use Sora to curate our newest digital content. Here are instructions for:

1. Go to the catalog (search.follettsoftware.com/metasearch/ui/113683)

2. Log in using your DOE username and password

3. Browse or search for books 

4. Check out digital materials, or place a hold on print materials.

Here are some detailed instructions for logging into Destiny on a mobile device or web browser

Log in using your DOE username and password on the website or in the app.

**Find your DOE username and password here.**

Sora

Sora by OverDrive

All of our newest eBooks and audiobooks are available on the platform, Sora. Here we have access to collections that are available to all students across the city, as well as titles selected by Ms. Rathgeb just for BHS. 

Log in using your nycstudents.net account on the website or in the app.

To access the Sora collection:

  1. Go to  https://soraapp.com/library/nycschools or download the app, Sora, by Overdrive (In the app you will be asked if you have a setup code. It is: nycschools)
  2. In the dropdown menu, select "Boerum Hill School for International Studies"
  3. Click "Sign in Using Boerum Hill School for International Studies"
  4. Enter your nycstudents.net email and password
  5. If you need to look up your nycstudents.net email or change your password, click here.

Here are some detailed instructions for logging into Sora on a mobile device or web browser.

Brooklyn Public Library

Brooklyn Public Library

BPL continues to have the greatest variety of books and other digital content available for free at this time. Although you may experience some higher-than-usual wait time, there is a lot that is available.

No library card? No problem! Fill out this application for a digital library card to access all their great content.

Libby eReader

Once you have your Brooklyn Public Library Card,  download the Libby eReader app to access eBooks and audiobooks from BPL.

Flipster

Check out the app Flipster, to access digital issues of popular magazines!

Fair Use

A note on fair use and copyright:  There are many things available on the internet. But unless a book is in "the public domain" or special permission has been granted by a publisher, books are not generally available for free. While they may be tempting to use right now, when accessing books has become so difficult, it is unethical to use or share these "bootleg" copies and files. Please exercise discretion when looking for digital content.

Research

Introduction to Research

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Introduction to Research


Learning to find a lot of information on your own is an important skill! Here's where you can access the school's 50+ databases. For even more databases, apply here for a NYPL library card and here for a Brooklyn Public Library card.
 
If you're not already a research pro, these pages will help you find the information you're looking for  for school or for fun!

Using Internet Sources

How do I research?

What about Artificial Intelligence?

Using Scholarly Databases

Database Index

Introduction to Research

Introduction to Research

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Introduction to Research


Learning to find a lot of information on your own is an important skill! Here's where you can access the school's 50+ databases. For even more databases, apply here for a NYPL library card and here for a Brooklyn Public Library card.
 
If you're not already a research pro, these pages will help you find the information you're looking for  for school or for fun!

Using Internet Sources

How do I research?

What about Artificial Intelligence?

Using Scholarly Databases

Database Index

Steps to Research & Inquiry

How do I research?

How do I research?

Follow these simple steps for conducting a research project. 

  1. Connect with your topic. Your teacher may assign a topic, or or you may need to choose one yourself. Read general information on the web or in a book (Wikipedia, encyclopedia...) to get some basic facts about the topic.
  2. Wonder about your topic. Now that you've read a bit, you will start to develop new questions. Choose one to pursue. Your teacher may assign you a research question, in that case you can start the process here.
  3. Investigate your topic. Look online, in the databases, and in books to find the answers to your research question. Remember to be savvy when you're looking for information. Not everything on the internet is true, and almost everything has a bias!
  4. Construct your conclusion. So you started with a question, now you should be developing a sense of what your answer is. Organize your ideas and the information you've gathered so they make sense to other people.
  5. Express your conclusion. This means do your task! It could be an essay, a presentation, conversation...anything! But here is where you formally answer your research question using all of the information you found and your own ideas.
  6. Reflect. Now you should ask yourself:  How did it go? If I was going to continue this process what would I do next? What would I do differently if I had it all to do over?

The resources below will help you understand these steps, and provide guidance on how to accomplish each one. 

Finding a topic

These two videos break down the process of finding a research topic. There is more to it than just thinking of something you think is cool -- although that is usually a great place to start!

 

**ProTip: Click fullscreen to see the videos better.

Inside most of our school's databases, you can use a thing called "Subject headings" that can help you narrow your topic down from a big idea that you're interested in, to something more manageable or a specific question. This video will show you how to access it, and how to use it. 

**PROTIP: Use fullscreen to see the presentation better.

In this video you can learn about what subject headings are, and how databases work differently from a Google search. Undersanding the differences can help improve your search strategies when using a database.

**PRO TIP:  Use fullscreen to see the video better.

Inside most of our school's databases, there is a feature called "topic finder" that can help you narrow your topic down from a big idea that you're interested in, to something more manageable or specific question. This video will show you how to access it, and how to use it. 

**PROTIP: Use fullscreen to see the video better.

Writing a research question

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A research question is the question is the center your research.  It should be:

  • clear: someone can easily understand its purpose without needing additional explanation.
  • focused: it can be answered thoroughly in the space required by the.
  • concise: it is expressed in the fewest possible words.
  • complex: it is not a “yes” or “no” question; the answer requires an analysis of sources.
  • arguable: there are multiple answers that are open to debate rather than accepted facts.

Text adapted from: George Mason University Writing Center

Image from: Lewis A. Jackson Library at Indiana Wesleyan University

Cycle of Inquiry


Inquiry is a cycle! This means that when you are investigating or researching a topic, you will often work backwards and forwards as you locate, evaluate and analyze information. Inquiry and research do not happen in a linear fashion. Instead, you will often loop back and revisit steps in the research project. In general, here are 6 phases of inquiry that you will visit and revisit: Connect, Wonder, Investigate, Construct, Express, and Reflect.

 

Using Internet Sources

Using Internet Sources

Using Internet Sources


Of course people want you to use books for research, but the internet is great too! As long as you use it (and cite it!) correctly.  There are bazillions of websites you can find using Google. Learn how to find what your looking for fast, and how to spot inaccuracies.

Google Search Tips

Vertical and Lateral Reading

Vertical and lateral reading are strategies for checking the validity of the information you find on the internet. Vertical reading is when you look at the source itself, and decide whether a website looks trustworthy. Lateral reading is when you look outside the source to see if the person or organization who published the website is a reliable authority.

Keywords, Synonyms, and Phrase Searching

Searching for synonyms is a great way to find additional information about your topic. For example If you're doing research on cats, but you only ever search the word "cat" you may miss articles that only use the word "feline" or specific kinds of cats like "leopard" or "panther." Watch this video to see how it works! 

At some point, even in formal academic research, you're going to have to use Google. Use these tips from Time magazine to help you maximize your Google searches.

11 Google Tricks That Will Change the Way You Search, from Time magazine, February 3rd, 2016.

The Problem With Websites

What's the problem with websites? 

In order to believe anything you read online, it is essential to know who put the information online, and why they are publishing it.

Anyone can access the internet, and anyone can publish on the internet. Some individuals and private corporations may put information online for reasons such as financial gain, or to forward a particular political or social agenda. For this reason, we cannot always trust that the information we find online is accurate or unbiased. 

How do I find good information on the internet?

  • Look for websites run by established institutions (governments, universities, libraries, authorities in your field etc…)
  • Steer clear of commercial sites (they want to make money)
  • Beware of bias (it changes your interpretation of information)
  • Check the date  (it might not be true anymore)
  • Consider the site's look (if it looks amateur, it probably is)
  • Avoid anonymous authors (why should you believe them?)

 


Adapted from:  Rogers, Tony. "8 Ways to Determine Website Reliability." ThoughtCo, Nov. 27, 2019, thoughtco.com/gauging-website-reliability-2073838.

Google Tools

Google Tools

These special forms of Google search will only search for certain types of website. That way you can ensure that you are getting more reliable information.

  • Google Scholar - results come from academic articles
  • Google Books - results from books that have been completely or partially digitized

Google Scholar Search
Google Book Search

Using Databases

Using Databases

Using Databases


Databases are great! They have so much information and the kinds of things you can't always find with Google. They also almost guarantee valid information!

They work a little differently though. You search a database using only key words -- like searching #hashtags on Instagram.

Find out just what the key differences are between databases and search engines, like Google, and see how you can get the most out  of them!

NOVELny Databases

Open-Access Databases

What are Databases?

What is a Database? 


A database is any organized collection of information. They are usually electronic and can be searched by users to find something specific. Usually when we talk about databases in the library, we are talking about collections of scholarly and professional articles, periodicals, primary source documents, etc... But really, a database can contain any kind of data, such as text, video, images, or sound files. 

 

Why Would I Use a Database Instead of Google? 

While Google is an amazing tool that is very easy to use, using scholarly databases to do research for schoolwork or other important projects will ensure that your sources of information come from reputable and objective sources. Additionally, because these databases are made specifically for doing research, there are tools such as topic finder, subject search, and a variety of filters that will help lead you to the information you need

How to use a database

The Deep Web and Why Libraries?

What's The Deep Web? Why the Library?


Why do I need to know all this stuff about databases when I can just find stuff online? This video will explain some of the reasons why using the library's resources, including databases, will usually provide higher quality information than searching the wild internet. 

All Databases

Database Index

Database Index


This is an index of all the databases our school has access to, organized by subject area. You can also search for a database using this alphabetical listing.

Power Search

Use this federated search to search ALL of the NOVELny databases at once.

Reference Databases

Career & Business Databases

Science

Interdisciplinary Databases

In-Context Databases

Publication Databases

Math, Technology, Data & Information Sciences

Economics

For Teachers

Spanish-Language

History Databases

Arts

Encyclopedia Britannica

CUNY Primary Source Databases

Bibliography & Citation

How to cite sources

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How Do I Cite Sources?


When doing ANYTHING with information you didn't make yourself, you have to say where it came form. Learn how to do it correctly. 

MLA Citation

Anatomy of the MLA Format


These are the necessary elements of any citation:
**Pay attention to order and punctuation!**
 
Author. Title. Title of container (not for books),
Other contributors (translators, editors)Version (edition)
Number (vol. and/or no.)Publisher, Publication date, 
Location (page numbers, URL or DOI)Date of Access (if
applicable).

Citation: A (very) Brief Introduction

EasyBib.com

EasyBib.com is a website that will help guide you through the process of making an MLA citation for your sources. It can be a little tricky to use, and there may be a lot of ads, but is definitely helpful because you won't have to remember all of the different rules on your own.

Common Types of Citation

Full Citations

These contain all of the necessary information about a source that you used and are included in a bibliography or works-cited page at the end of a larger work (like an essay or presentation). They let your readers know exactly where you found all of the information you found in your research 

Book

Leroux, Marcel. Global Warming: Myth Or Reality?: The Erring Ways of
Climatology. Springer, 2005.

Website

Felluga, Dino. Guide to Literary and Critical TheoryPurdue U, 28 Nov. 2003, 

www.cla.purdue.edu/english/theory/. Accessed 10 May 2006.

Article in an online database

Langhamer, Claire. “Love and Courtship in Mid-Twentieth-Century England.” 
Historical Journal, vol. 50, no. 1, 2007, pp. 173-96. ProQuest, doi:10.1017/S0018246X06005966. Accessed 27 May 2009.
 
In-Text Citations

These are a shorthand for full citations. They are used within the text of a paper or a presentation so that your reader knows that you are quoting or paraphrasing the work of someone else. In-text citations should contain just enough information so that your reader can find the source if they look in your bibliography, but not so much that it makes your work difficult to read.

--

You can reference a source in the text of your essay, and include the page number where necessary in parentheses. For example:

As Howard Zinn points out in his book, A People's History of the United States, "when the war in Mexico began, New York workingmen called a meeting to oppose the war." (159)

--

Alternatively, you can provide a parenthetical citation with the author's last name and the page number the quotation comes from:

"When the war in Mexico began, New York workingmen called a meeting to oppose the war." (Zinn, 159)

***

You must use either method of in-text citation even if you are paraphrasing the source and not directly quoting it!

Purdue Owl MLA Style Guide

The Purdue OWL is a resource from Purdue University that provides free, easily understood information about how and when to cite virtually any kind of source. Use the headings on the left side of the page to help you find the types of citation (and examples!) that you need.

 

LGBTQ+ Resources

LGBTQIA+ Resources

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Here you will find lots of information about Coming Out, staying connected, and being an ally! There are links to outside organizations and publications that can help you stay informed, stay safe, and stay you!

LGBTQIA+ Audiobook Collection

In order to access the books you will need your DOE username. You can set it up here. E-mail Mr. Hyland for the password you need to access the catalog.

Once you have access to the catalog you can download the MackinVIA app to listed to the collection on your mobile device. Follow these instructions for downloading the MackinVIA app and accessing the audiobooks.

If audiobooks aren't your thing check out additional Queer Lit ebooks that you can read on your computer or mobile device using the Destiny Read app.

Gender and Sexuality Terms

LGBTQIA+ | LGBT+ AminoVocabulary is very important. We want to make sure that we use the correct terms to describe people, and we want to be sure that we are using language that is not offensive or defamatory. Here are some common terms used to describe people in the LGBTQIA+ community. You can find additional terms in these places:

Asexual | The lack of a sexual attraction or desire for other people.

Bisexual | A person emotionally, romantically or sexually attracted to more than one sex, gender or gender identity though not necessarily simultaneously, in the same way or to the same degree.

Gay | A person who is emotionally, romantically or sexually attracted to members of the same gender.

Intersex | An umbrella term used to describe a wide range of natural bodily variations. In some cases, these traits are visible at birth, and in others, they are not apparent until puberty. Some chromosomal variations of this type may not be physically apparent at all. 

Lesbian | A woman who is emotionally, romantically or sexually attracted to other women.

Queer | A term people often use to express fluid identities and orientations. Often used interchangeably with "LGBTQ."

Questioning | A term used to describe people who are in the process of exploring their sexual orientation or gender identity.

Transgender | An umbrella term for people whose gender identity and/or expression is different from cultural expectations based on the sex they were assigned at birth. Being transgender does not imply any specific sexual orientation. Therefore, transgender people may identify as straight, gay, lesbian, bisexual, etc.

The Trevor Project

LGBTQIA+ Audiobook Collection

Coming Out

There's no right or wrong way to come out. You should just make sure that you are safe and comfortable when you do it. And just because you identify in one way, doesn't mean you won't identify differently later! You don't have to be certain in order to come out. 

If you're not sure whether it's a good time for you to come out, or if you just want to talk about possibilities, you can always reach out to a friend, a family member, a teacher or other trusted adult who can help you figure it out.

Gender Unicorn

The Gender Unicorn helps you visualize your own gender and sexual identities, and to see that they can be fluid!

Follow the link to fill one out for yourself! You can then print or e-mail your unicorn as a way of sharing your identities, or even coming out!

HRC Youth Report

Library Resources

LGBTQIA+ Resources

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Here you will find lots of information about Coming Out, staying connected, and being an ally! There are links to outside organizations and publications that can help you stay informed, stay safe, and stay you!

LGBTQIA+ Audiobook Collection

In order to access the books you will need your DOE username. You can set it up here. E-mail Mr. Hyland for the password you need to access the catalog.

Once you have access to the catalog you can download the MackinVIA app to listed to the collection on your mobile device. Follow these instructions for downloading the MackinVIA app and accessing the audiobooks.

If audiobooks aren't your thing check out additional Queer Lit ebooks that you can read on your computer or mobile device using the Destiny Read app.

Gender and Sexuality Terms

LGBTQIA+ | LGBT+ AminoVocabulary is very important. We want to make sure that we use the correct terms to describe people, and we want to be sure that we are using language that is not offensive or defamatory. Here are some common terms used to describe people in the LGBTQIA+ community. You can find additional terms in these places:

Asexual | The lack of a sexual attraction or desire for other people.

Bisexual | A person emotionally, romantically or sexually attracted to more than one sex, gender or gender identity though not necessarily simultaneously, in the same way or to the same degree.

Gay | A person who is emotionally, romantically or sexually attracted to members of the same gender.

Intersex | An umbrella term used to describe a wide range of natural bodily variations. In some cases, these traits are visible at birth, and in others, they are not apparent until puberty. Some chromosomal variations of this type may not be physically apparent at all. 

Lesbian | A woman who is emotionally, romantically or sexually attracted to other women.

Queer | A term people often use to express fluid identities and orientations. Often used interchangeably with "LGBTQ."

Questioning | A term used to describe people who are in the process of exploring their sexual orientation or gender identity.

Transgender | An umbrella term for people whose gender identity and/or expression is different from cultural expectations based on the sex they were assigned at birth. Being transgender does not imply any specific sexual orientation. Therefore, transgender people may identify as straight, gay, lesbian, bisexual, etc.

The Trevor Project

LGBTQIA+ Audiobook Collection

Coming Out

There's no right or wrong way to come out. You should just make sure that you are safe and comfortable when you do it. And just because you identify in one way, doesn't mean you won't identify differently later! You don't have to be certain in order to come out. 

If you're not sure whether it's a good time for you to come out, or if you just want to talk about possibilities, you can always reach out to a friend, a family member, a teacher or other trusted adult who can help you figure it out.

Gender Unicorn

The Gender Unicorn helps you visualize your own gender and sexual identities, and to see that they can be fluid!

Follow the link to fill one out for yourself! You can then print or e-mail your unicorn as a way of sharing your identities, or even coming out!

HRC Youth Report

NYCJA - Gender Identity Resources

New York City Junior Ambassadors

 

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In the 2019-2020 school year the New York City Junior Ambassadors club worked with the United Nations to learn about the UN sustainability goals for 2030. We focused on Gender Identity. Here are the products that they made to help people understand the many different facets of gender identity and how it is represented in the society.  

 
SDG #5 - Gender Identity

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The Gender Equality SDG aims to:

End all forms of discrimination against all women and girls everywhere

Eliminate all forms of violence against all women and girls in the public and private spheres, including trafficking and sexual and other types of exploitation

Eliminate all harmful practices, such as child, early and forced marriage and female genital mutilation

Recognize and value unpaid care and domestic work and promote shared responsibility within the household and the family as nationally appropriate

Ensure women’s full and effective participation and equal opportunities for leadership  in political, economic and public life 

And more!


Find out more about the other UN Sustainability Development Goals here

LGBTQ+ Friendly Countries


These students did independent research into different countries to find out how LGBTQ people are treated there, and protected under the law. They compiled their findings in an easy-to-read infographic.

Gender Identity and Culture


While researching this issue we learned that gender equality is different all around the world. And even things like climate change can affect how people see gender equality. Different cultures and religions see gender equality in different ways. Our slideshow demonstrates how people see gender equality all around the world. 

Gender Stereotypes in Society


These students looked at gender stereotypes and tried to uncover the different places where they exist in our everyday lives. They offer some strategies for how we can combat them, and explain why it is important to do so.

Junior Ambassadors at Work!


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Subject Guides

Subject Guides

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Subject Area Guides


Below are specific guides for each of the subject areas offered at BHS.  They are primarily geared toward teachers looking for resources but can also be used by students working on independent projects. In the left-hand column are some general resources that are not department-specific.

Subscription Information

Netflix Documentaries

High-leverage Databases

Spanish-language Databases

IB Theater Resources

Arts & Design

Individuals & Societies

Language Acquisition

Language & Literature

Mathematics

Physical Education & Health Sciences

Sciences

Curriculum and Lessons

Arts & Design

Arts & Design Subject Guide

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Arts & Design


Art

Theater & Dance

STEM

Art & Design Databases

Culinary Arts & Food Studies

Field Trips

Individuals & Societies

Individuals & Societies Subject Guide

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Individuals & Societies


Research in Context

Encyclopedia Britannica

Opposing Viewpoints

Additional Databases

Outside Resources

Reference Desk

Language Acquisition

Language Acquisition Subject Guide

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Language Acquisition


eBooks and Audiobooks in Multiple Languages

Audible by Amazon has made a wide variety of audiobooks available to the public for FREE!

Linguee

Linguee Bilingual Dictionaries


Linguee offers one-to-one translateion as well as bilingual dictionaries in French an other languages. You can use the website or download the app.

Translators

DuoLingo Schools

Spanish-Language Course Content

Spanish-Language Content


These databases offer reference, biographical, and geographical material, as well as articles and other kinds of information to supplement coursework. 

Studio Story - ENL & Arts Curriculum

World Digital Library

Mango Classroom

**LOGIN INFORMATION REQUIRED.**
Contact vincent.hyland@k497.org for username and password

Teachers can also e-mail vincent.hyland@k497.org for support setting up a class.

TV5Monde

TV 5 Monde


This French-language news source also offers a language-learning activities using authentic news sources. They have content aligned to the European Framework and even offer a diagnostic test! 

New York Times E.L.L. & Art

New York Times E.L.L. & Art


Resources for teaching English language learners and the arts using New York Times content. Resources include lots of images and writing prompts as well as readings on current events.

Reference Desk

Language & Literature

Language & Literature Subject Guide

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Language & Literature


Independent Reading

Independent Reading


Resources for accessing eBooks, audiobooks, online comics and more is available on the "eBooks and Audiobooks" tab of this website. There you will find information on finding and accessing a wide variety of materials remotely. There is login information required for some. If you email me directly, at vincent.hyland@k497.org I can help you get yourself and/or your students set up.

Teaching a Class Book

LOGIN INFORMATION REQUIRED.
Contact vincent.hyland@k497.org for username and password.

Curriculum & Lessons

Databases

Encyclopedia Britannica

Opposing Viewpoints

Research in Context

Literary Criticism

Reference Desk

Mathematics

Mathematics Subject Guide

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Mathematics


Research in Context

Outside Resources

Additional Databases

Opposing Viewpoints in Context

Encyclopedia Britannica

Reference Desk

Physical Education & Health Sciences

Physical Education & Health Sciences Subject Guide

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Physical Education &

Health Sciences


Research in Context

Encyclopedia Britannica

Opposing Viewpoints

Home Work Outs

Databases

Outside Resources

Reference Desk

Sciences

Sciences Subject Guide

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Sciences


Research in Context

Encyclopedia Britannica

Browse Articles on Science and Mathematics
Astronomy Chemistry  Mathematics Physical Science
Biological Sciences  Earth Sciences   Medicine Social Sciences

Browse Articles on

Earth and Geography

Browse Articles on

Life Processes

Continents Biosphere
Oceans Life Cycle
Physical Features Organs and Organ Systems
The Earth Vital Processes
Browse Additional Articles on  
Animals Plants
Living Things (other) Technology
  Browse All Articles >>

Opposing Viewpoints

Outside Resources

Science Databases

Reference Desk

Extended Essay

Extended Essay

Extended Essay


What is the Extended Essay?

The extended essay is an in-depth study of a focused topic, in a particular subject area. It is a unique opportunity for students to explore an academic area in which they have a personal interest, with individual guidance from a supervisor.

This takes the form of an independently written research paper that allows students to demonstrate their passion, enthusiasm, intellectual initiative and/or creative approach for their chosen topic. Such topics can range from focused, in-depth analyses of specific elements of a subject to critically evaluating responses to issues of global significance.

At a Glance:

  • A student must achieve a D grade or higher to be awarded the Diploma.
  • The extended essay process helps prepare students for success at university and in other pathways beyond the Diploma Programme.
  • The extended essay is a piece of independent research on a topic chosen by the student in consultation with a supervisor in the school.
  • It is presented as a formal piece of sustained academic writing containing no more than 4,000 words.
  • It is the result of approximately 40 hours of work by the student.
  • Students are supported by a supervision process recommended to be 3–5 hours, which includes three mandatory reflection sessions. 

What is the Extended Essay?

How does the EE work?

The Extended Essay is a requirement for an IB diploma.

First, you will choose a subject area (history, art, biology, etc...) that interests you and that you would like to investigate. Next, you will choose a topic from within that subject area. Finally you will refine your topic into a clear and focused research question. This is the most important part of your planning for the extended essay, because it will guide your research and writing. The text of your essay will be an answer to the research question.

You will be assigned a supervisor who is knowledgeable in your subject area. This person will help you with your research, and provide advice and some feedback on your process. While the essay itself is scored by the IB based on five criteria, your supervisor will also give you a score based on your engagement in the process.